How to Retire Young with Only 50k in Your Savings

Bear with me here. It’s not a full proof plan but I think you’ll see where I’m going with this pretty quick.

It’s not exactly retiring. More accurately, I’m just explaining how to live on any continent by only working part time for the rest of your life with one skill that takes less than 1 year to learn.

The skill?

A new language.

The reason I’m using this skill as an example is because it’s not too hard to learn, is extremely useful for a lot of different reasons all around the world, and it can have a decent payout for the average person. By using the methods I’ll explain below, learning a new language will go hand in hand teaching English and writing, which will be the bases for earning the extra income you’ll need.

How much will you earn?

As a teacher: Let’s say a median of 10-20 USD an hour. Sometimes more.

As a translator: Let’s say a median of $10-20 an hour as well.

Let’s say you work online and after a year in the field you find a way to make $15 an hour. That’s reasonable and realistic. Do a little bit of research and you’ll know.

That’s $300 a month part time.

That sucks right? Well, not if you front load your time and effort into an investment plan that makes you $175 a month. If you can find a place to rent that cheap, you’ll pay off your rent without doing shit. So, now your $300 all goes towards your other monthly expenses such as food and entertainment.

So, what are we really doing here?

You’re going to make 175USD a month in passive income and you’re going to live in a country that only costs $475 a month for living. So, find a place that’s only $175 a month to rent or a hostel that’s $5.80 a night.

With that other $300, that’s $10 a day on food and entertainment.

Sound crazy? It’s not.

Here’s that plan:

Work to save a lot, then live in a place that’s cheap as hell:

Here’s some places you can live that cheap:

Cambodia, Republic of the Philippines, Laos, Sri Lanka, Jamaica, China, Fiji, Eastern Europe, Nicaragua, Thailand, Bali, and Vietnam.

I’ve been to the Philippines and Thailand multiple times. I know you can live on less than $10 a day and never feel like you’re cutting corners or being cheap.

The catch(es):

1) You can’t have dependents (kids).
2) For the first 5 years, you’ll have to front load your work so you can save 50k. For this example, I’m going to use the specific amount of $48,400 dollars.

How do you save/make x dollars a month?

Over the course of 5 years you’d need to save $10,000 a year. That’s $28 a day or $192 a week. Let’s say you need to save $767 a month. That’s not as simple as it sounds. If you work minimum wage that’s like trying to earn an extra paycheck every week.

However, it can be done, and it’s done all the time by average people. All you need is the ability to read, speak, and write. Here’s two tried and true methods of what I’m talking about:

Once you get into the groove of doing these two things. It’s not inconceivable to make $200+ a week teaching English for two hours after work or writing articles on your weekends.

What do you do with the 48,400 you saved?

Invest in P2P Lending. With websites like LendingClub and Prosper, it’s not unreasonable to expect an 8-12% return on with a lot of notes. For example, LendingClub says 90% of its investors with over 100 notes at $25 each make between 5-10% on returns.

For this example, I’m going to go high, and use 10 percent as an expectation.

You’ll have $40,000 invested, so you can’t spend any of that on any expenses.
So, for living you’ll use the $8,400 you saved for food, etc. at an expense of $11.50 a day for 2 years (not including rent).

If you make 10% a year on that 40k:

40,000 becomes 44,000 after one year
then 48,400 after two
53,240 after three
58,564 after four and so on.

Over the course of 5 years, you just made $18,654.

After 2 years, you’ll have made your $8,400 back.

So, there you go, after two years you just had your living expenses (excluding rent) paid for.

Here’s some more details on cheap places to live where you can do this:

Southeast Asia

Cost of living in Thailand is 42.54% lower than in United States (aggregate data for all cities, rent is not taken into account). Rent in Thailand is 62.31% lower than in United States (average data for all cities).

Cost of living in Taiwan is 18.31% lower than in United States (aggregate data for all cities, rent is not taken into account). Rent in Taiwan is 61.76% lower than in United States (average data for all cities).

Cost of living in Cambodia is 38.63% lower than in United States (aggregate data for all cities, rent is not taken into account). Rent in Cambodia is 62.83% lower than inUnited States (average data for all cities).

Cost of living in Malaysia is 43.54% lower than in United States (aggregate data for all cities, rent is not taken into account). Rent in Malaysia is 70.63% lower than in United States (average data for all cities).

Cost of living in Laos is 25.92% lower than in United States (aggregate data for all cities, rent is not taken into account). Rent in Laos is 64.62% lower than in United States (average data for all cities).

South America

Cost of living in Brazil is 29.76% lower than in United States (aggregate data for all cities, rent is not taken into account). Rent in Brazil is 61.12% lower than in United States (average data for all cities).

Cost of living in Argentina is 25.76% lower than in United States (aggregate data for all cities, rent is not taken into account). Rent in Argentina is 63.39% lower than in United States (average data for all cities).

Cost of living in Ecuador is 38.86% lower than in United States (aggregate data for all cities, rent is not taken into account). Rent in Ecuador is 68.81% lower than in United States (average data for all cities).

Cost of living in Chile is 34.37% lower than in United States (aggregate data for all cities, rent is not taken into account). Rent in Chile is 61.96% lower than in United States (average data for all cities).

Central America:

Cost of living in Honduras is 35.85% lower than in United States (aggregate data for all cities, rent is not taken into account). Rent in Honduras is 72.38% lower than in United States (average data for all cities).

Cost of living in Jamaica is 26.02% lower than in United States (aggregate data for all cities, rent is not taken into account). Rent in Jamaica is 69.41% lower than in United States (average data for all cities).

Africa:

Cost of living in South Africa is 45.19% lower than in United States (aggregate data for all cities, rent is not taken into account). Rent in South Africa is 61.15% lower than in United States (average data for all cities).

Cost of living in Morocco is 52.02% lower than in United States (aggregate data for all cities, rent is not taken into account). Rent in Morocco is 74.48% lower than in United States (average data for all cities).

Cost of living in Nigeria is 59.39% lower than in United States (aggregate data for all cities, rent is not taken into account). Rent in Nigeria is 62.38% lower than in United States (average data for all cities).

Cost of living in Zimbabwe is 31.98% lower than in United States (aggregate data for all cities, rent is not taken into account). Rent in Zimbabwe is 67.74% lower than in United States (average data for all cities).

So, with your lending account taking care of living expenses, all you really have to come up with is rent money. This can be easily done by learning a second language and either teaching or translating with that skill part time. Private English lessons are in high demand in a lot of these low cost of living places. If you were to know any second language, then you’re almost guaranteed to find part time work from home as a private tutor, or using the online platforms mentioned before. If you find a way to do this, making your rent with only a few hours of work a week is not an outrageous expectation.

Conclusion:

I understand it’s not this cut and dry. Investing in P2P lending can’t guarantee a 10% return and there’s other expenses to consider such as expat and other taxes. But on a general level, all I’m really suggesting here is living in a place where the cost of living is extremely low, using lending as a form of passive income and using a second language as a skill to make extra income on your own time.

What am I missing here? Should somebody beat my ass right now?

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On Tacos, Toilet Paper, and Turning Twenty-seven

The Wondering Wandering Woman

This past Sunday I turned twenty-seven and celebrated the first of two birthdays that will occur during my Peace Corps service. Twenty-seven. Twenty-seven. Man, do I feel old! I’m almost thirty. Ouch. It actually hurt to type that a little bit. Twenty-seven… Twenty-seven actually became a significant number in my life almost a year ago. No, it wasn’t because I had just turned twenty-six, but rather because last December was when I started thinking about joining the Peace Corps: a twenty-seven month commitment of voluntary service abroad. A year later here I am: twenty-seven years old and writing this blog from my site in the Philippines, officially a Peace Corps Volunteer! Time is a wonderfully, peculiar thing, isn’t it?

Anyway, enough philosophizing and on to the celebrations! I started my birthday like any other day of the week, with a sunrise run to the pier. I followed this with…

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How To Get Cheap International Flights

I’m not sure if 3 months before on a Tuesday is always right but I know it’s true for the most part. Around 3 months before I was trying to go to Asia a friend of mine found tickets to South Korea for 450 USD and we bought them right away. I’ve never seen lower than that. From there it was between 100 to 300 to almost anywhere in Southeast Asia. I ended up going to over 5 countries over the course of 2 months and spent less than 1000 USD on plane tickets total.

Alesia's Affordable Adventures

Yes. The secret formula exists. It is true.

After researching and researching and researching a kajillion articles on Google, Pinterest and Facebook I read multiple different answers to the question “When are international flights the cheapest?” It was frustrating. So I tested it myself.

I used Expedia to help me with this – they compare hundred of flights to find you the cheapest and fastest route for you. All the articles said, “6 months before your trip! 2 months before your trip! 6 weeks before your trip!” I didn’t know who to believe. I didn’t want to risk to buy my ticket at the 6 month price only to find out it’s cheaper at 2 months.

Here’s what I learned: I stumbled upon some great information from an article on Pinterest one day. (I wish I could find it but it’s hidden somewhere deep in the internet haha) That the…

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